Buying a Lancer Evo?

leslie

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leslie

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Buying a Lancer Evo?

Lets get straight to it. Unlike some performance cars, no Mitsubishi evo can be run on a shoestring. So, although you can now buy some of the earliest Evo’s at a bargain price, servicing, insurance and parts remain as costly as later models.
So, which one to buy? The evo I,II and III look quite dated now and are rarer, but significantly cheaper to buy and still remain a choice to some buyers. The better equipped Evo IV and V look much more aggressive, with improved handling and performance. The VI is still favoured among enthusiasts, especially the Tommi Makinen edition.
The tamer looking Evo VII- often accused of being the softer choice, is still a deeply impressive driving machine. Of the later Evos, the VIII / MR’s – the first to have six speed gearbox- heralded a return to more aggressive styling, plus even more aggressive handling and performance. If you are buying an earlier evo, get the dealer to offer some sort of warranty.
For some, the stripped out RS versions and mega powered Extreme models are too hard edged to be daily drivers.
Tuning wise, completely standard cars are a rarity, so expect most cars to boast a few minor mods, like sports exhaust or brake/suspension upgrade.also remember that, let the engine warm up properly before driving hard and allow the turbo to cool for a minute or two before turning off the ignition. (turbo timer is important)

Engine
The 4G63 engine used in all evos is resilient, provided regular servicing is performed. Fully synthetic oil (and AYC fluid, where fitted) needs changing every 4500 miles, and spark plugs and timing belts every 45,000 miles. Most cars will also have boost gauge fitted, with standard boost around 1.2bar. Cooling system expansion tanks can over flow when its hot, so always check the water level. Avoid cars displaying engine warning lights on the dashboard. Starting problems or stuttering acceleration could be caused by loose vacuum hoses, worm plugs or failed coil packs. Noisy tappets are normal.
If the car is not driven regularly, the battery is easily depleted – and some evo VIIs have pressure relief valve springs which are too stiff and can cause stalling. Changing to an evo VI part seems to resolve the problem.

Transmision
Standard clutches wear extremely quickly on all models, and many cars have upgraded items. Look for slippage, high biting points and an acrid smell of burning clutch material.
Gearbox have been known to give up, with bulky changes into first, second, fifth and reverse gear being the most common indicators. Worn gearbox output shaft bearings will also cost a lot.
Any clonking from the front end could indicate front helical LSD bolt failure. On later models, the ACD pump has been known to fail. This could be expensive to replace. So check that the green lights in the snow/gravel/tarmac switches light up properly.

Suspension
Strut top mount bushes, anti roll bar bushes and drop links all wear out with age, producing a knocking noise on turning. Many owners will have changed to aftermarket coilcovers.

Brakes
Brakes take a hammering on all evos, and some suffer from warped disc. The only solution is to replace the original disc with quality aftermarket kit. (if after skimming for the 3rd time). Ensure that the brake fluid is changed every 18.000miles on all cars.

Bodywork and exhaust
Expect some stone chips on the front end and rear arch extensions. Look for signs of overspray and inconsistent panel gaps, which may indicate hidden accident damage. Rust inside the bootlid is common, but you should also check the suspension and underbody.

Interior
On all but the oldest Evos, interior trim should be in good condition, but the recline adjustments on Recaro seats gradually slips back over a period of time. The only proper solution is an expensive replacement base frame.
All warning lights should go off on start-up; if the AYC, ABS, or oil lights stay on, Walk away! Also check the operations of all electric windows and mirrors, aircon and optional sunroof.
Many owners fit an aftermarket boost gauge as a diagnostic tool. When properly warmed up, check out the maximum boost on test drive. On evo I,II,III,IV should be under 1.0bar. and under 1.3 bar on later models. Also ensure that the water spray system to the intercooler is working properly.

This is a compilation on articals that i've read.. hope this helps those up coming evo owners!!!!

HAPPY SHOPPING!
 

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oonbc

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oonbc

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leslie,

wow, thanks alot... this can be my bible... :)
 

leslie

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leslie

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just hope this helps to new upcoming lancer/evo owners!!!

hehehe
 

nicknick

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Leslie,

Great tips!

Question:
My car's break develop vibration during breaking (approx above 70km/h). Is this caused by disk wrapping problems? My current break pads are at 60-70%.

Note: this car has not being on the road for quite sometime (2months)

Please advise.
thanks
 

leslie

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leslie

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nicknick,
i think its high chance of uneven surface... have you skim your disc rotors b4? coz i had the same problem last time... after proper skimming..then its ok.. but now i change to aftermarket rotor oledy lah!! hehehe
 
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nicknick

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nicknick

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Leslie, skim the front 2 rotors will do?

Where did you bring yours to skim last time?
After the skimming, do I need to do my wheels alignment again?
 

leslie

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leslie

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there is this guy named ah ming.. he is a evo owner as well and also a member of mloc.. check which side is uneven.. you can actually feel if its front or back... but usually its the front due to hard braking..hehe..

how he did was he took the rotors to a metal machine shop that has one of those huge machines that does custom made pressision metal cutter/grinder....

and yes after skimming you need to do your alignment again!usually..hehehe
 

Cannonfodder

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Cannonfodder

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Shoestring = low budget.

Means skimping on maintenance, like skipping oil changes, using crapola oil, using lower grade parts, etc.

Some of these will just reduce your enjoyment of the car, some will put your car at risk of potential damage. You need to be able to fix any problems as they appear, preferably even before that. Else, you'll just line yourself up for a bigger hit.

What the OP means to say is, don't buy an EVO if you won't be able to maintain it.
 

leslie

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leslie

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thanks cannonfodder.. for the explanation...
well.. if you are not ready to maintain an evo.. maybe you can get a lancer first.. and convert later..hehehehehe...
 

leslie

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leslie

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nicknick,
charges i cant remember... but its not expensive though...hhmm.. you need to ask around.. but make sure you get the correct skimming process...
 

gooseman

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gooseman

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GP, Johor
great topic. got a question here but donno if this is the right toipc to ask.. buy anyway here goes....

Car: EVO IV standard with mild mods on exhaust (wastegate and exhaust pipe, Tanabe end can)

at abt 4500rpm to 6000 rpm / 4th or 5th gear... the cars seems to splutter and doesn't wanna 'go' unless I slam it right from 1st gear....

could it be:

1. the spark plugs?
2. boost leakage?
3. ignition coils?
4. grounding of the engine?
5. Fuel Filter clogged?
6. my worst fear, ECU?
 

Cannonfodder

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Cannonfodder

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Probably fouled plugs, possibly ignition coils. Would you happen to have a blow-off installed?

We have an EVO/Lancer maintenance thread somewhere, maybe the mods can sticky that, too.
 

kampoon

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kampoon

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NickNick & Leslie,

I saw skimming being done without take out the rotor one........the machanic just jack up the car then buka the rim and start skimmiing on the spot with a machine to skim the disc surface..........maybe this one for lower cost skimming lor......
 

Cannonfodder

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Cannonfodder

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^^ That is what most mechanics do to save on labour and cost. Do it like this and it's almost a certainty that you'll be doing it again.
 

Cannonfodder

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Cannonfodder

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If warp is not bad and mild vibration has only begun to set in, buy a set of metallic pads (don't need expensive ones, cos you'll only use them for a bit) and do a few bed-in runs with them. That will cure the problem, plus you get to keep the pads for whenever your rotors start to run again.
 

gooseman

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gooseman

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Found the cause for my problem... the socket to the no 2 coil is loose... sooo when vibration gets big (like when travelling in high gear at low speed) it disconnects and leaves cylinder no 3 with no ignition.....